msrowleys

nevver:

I would prefer not to

posted 2 days ago with 3,437 notes
via: celaenoo source: markmcevoy

(Source: justinbiebergoth)

posted 2 days ago with 152,091 notes
via: twice-pe source: justinbiebergoth

misandry-mermaid:

oh-snap-pro-choice:

breerun:

queennubian:

preach Jada!

ME IN EVERY SINGLE MOVIE LATELY

coughSTARTREKINTODARKNESScough

- Jane

The horror genre in a nutshell.

(Source: lohan)

posted 2 days ago with 55,811 notes
via: fourthrain source: lohan

maliataete:

queerbriel:

welcome to womens clothing where the sizes are made up and the measurements don’t matter

posted 2 days ago with 61,148 notes
via: lesbianmorrigan source: queerbriel

tardiscrash:

Let’s be real, in a time before the internet people didn’t have more adventures and make more meaningful connections. They watched TV and listened to CDs. Before that they listened to records and read magazines. Before that they listened to the radio and read bad dime novels. Before that they embroidered or some shit.

People have been staying inside and ignoring other people for as long as there have been buildings. 

posted 2 days ago with 136,454 notes
via: celaenoo source: tardiscrash

Robert A. Heinlein, Time Enough for Love

Terrible book, but a great quote.

(via stoweboyd)

A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion, butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders, give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
posted 3 days ago with 152 notes
via: celaenoo source: stoweboyd
posted 3 days ago with 56 notes
# house of cards
—David Abram here (via shrinkrants)

… we don’t realize that the astonishing linguistic capacity of the human brain did not evolve in relation to the computer, nor even in relation to written texts. Rather, it evolved in relation to stories that were passed down orally. For countless millennia, stories and story-telling were the way we humans learned our language. Spoken stories are something that we enter into with our bodies. We feel our way around inside a story.

I think children really need to experience stories and to hear their parents and their uncles and their aunts telling them stories. And I don’t mean reading stories to them, but simply improvising stories face-to-face with a child. Or stepping outside and pointing to the forest edge and saying, “Do you know what happens inside that forest every full moon?” Or, “Look at the river. Do you know how the river feels whenever the salmon returns to its waters? It feels this way, and this is the story that tells why.”

posted 3 days ago with 220 notes
via: celaenoo source: shrinkrants

if-youcantsleep:

posted 4 days ago with 141 notes
via: if-youcantsleep source: if-youcantsleep

(Source: bcnhills)

posted 5 days ago with 154,160 notes
via: in-the-impala-gallifreystands source: bcnhills

nevver:

What we’re reading

posted 6 days ago with 850 notes
via: nevver source: nevver

bigbigtruck:

GUYS

DID YOU KNOW TREES HAVE LEAVES

posted 6 days ago with 143,687 notes
via: bigbigtruck source: bigbigtruck

celaenoo:

blackoutraven:

Hummingbird

"Everything takes time. Bees have to move very fast to stay still."

— David Foster Wallace, Brief Interviews with Hideous Men

posted 6 days ago with 2,907 notes
via: celaenoo source: blackoutraven

Lake and its buisness
Amandine Paulandré

(Source: GIVNCVRLOS)

posted 6 days ago with 4,197 notes
via: hailhydrra source: givncvrlos
Forty years ago, a vast molten cavity known as the Darvaza crater – nicknamed the “door to hell” – opened up in the desert of north Turkmenistan, and has been burning ever since. Now, Canadian explorer George Kourounis has became the first to make the descent into the fiery pit to look for signs of life (x)
posted 6 days ago with 8,172 notes
via: celaenoo source: gnossienne